Chief Meteorologist Paul Williams WX Updates

Ozone-Depleting Compound Persists, NASA Research Shows

You are subscribed to Breaking News for NASA. This information has recently been updated, and is now available.

Ozone-Depleting Compound Persists, NASA Research Shows [ http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/august/ozone-depleting-compound-persists-nasa-research-shows ] 08/20/2014 12:00 PM EDT
NASA research shows Earth’s atmosphere contains an unexpectedly large amount of an ozone-depleting compound from an unknown source decades after the compound was banned worldwide.

[ http://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNASA/bulletins/cb0a05?reqfrom=share ]

This e-mail update was generated automatically based on your subscriptions. Some updates may belong to more than one category, resulting in duplicate notices.

Ozone-Depleting Compound Persists, NASA Research Shows

You are subscribed to Earth News for NASA. This information has recently been updated, and is now available.

Ozone-Depleting Compound Persists, NASA Research Shows [ http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/august/ozone-depleting-compound-persists-nasa-research-shows ] 08/20/2014 12:00 PM EDT
NASA research shows Earth’s atmosphere contains an unexpectedly large amount of an ozone-depleting compound from an unknown source decades after the compound was banned worldwide.

[ http://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNASA/bulletins/cb0b3c?reqfrom=share ]

This e-mail update was generated automatically based on your subscriptions. Some updates may belong to more than one category, resulting in duplicate notices.

NASA Announces Awards to Expand Informal STEM Education Network

You are subscribed to Breaking News for NASA. This information has recently been updated, and is now available.

NASA Announces Awards to Expand Informal STEM Education Network [ http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/august/nasa-announces-awards-to-expand-informal-stem-education-network ] 08/20/2014 12:00 PM EDT
NASA Announces Awards to Expand Informal STEM Education Network

[ http://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNASA/bulletins/cb052d?reqfrom=share ]

This e-mail update was generated automatically based on your subscriptions. Some updates may belong to more than one category, resulting in duplicate notices.

Retreat of Yakutat Glacier

You are subscribed to Image of the Day for NASA. This information has recently been updated, and is now available.

Retreat of Yakutat Glacier [ http://www.nasa.gov/content/retreat-of-yakutat-glacier ] 08/20/2014 12:00 PM EDT Located in the Brabazon Range of southeastern Alaska, Yakutat Glacier is one of the fastest retreating glaciers in the world. It is the primary outlet for the 810-square kilometer (310-square mile) Yakutat ice field, which drains into Harlequin Lake and, ultimately, the Gulf of Alaska. The Operational Land Imager on the Landsat 8 satellite captured this image of the glacier and lake on Aug. 13, 2013. Snow and ice appear white and forests are green. The brown streaks on the glaciers are lateral and medial moraines. Over the past 26 years, the glacier’s terminus has retreated more than 5 kilometers (3 miles). What is causing the rapid retreat? University of Alaska glaciologist Martin Truffer and colleagues pointed to a number of factors in their 2013 study published in the Journal of Glaciology. The chief cause is the long-term contraction of the Yakutat Ice Field, which has been shrinking since the height of the Little Ice Age. Once part of a much larger ice field, Yakutat has been contracting for hundreds of years. As other nearby glaciers retreated, Yakutat ice field was cut off from higher-elevation areas that once supplied a steady flow of ice from the north. With that flow cut off, there simply is not enough snow falling over the low-elevation Yakutat ice field to prevent it from retreating. Beyond this natural change, human-caused global warming has hastened the speed of the retreat. Between 1948–2000, mean annual temperatures in Yakutat increased by 1.38° Celsius (2.48° Fahrenheit). Between 2000 and 2010, they rose by another 0.48°C (0.86°F). The warmer temperatures encourage melting and sublimation at all ice surfaces exposed to the air. In the past few years, the breakdown of a long, floating ice tongue has triggered especially dramatic changes in the terminus of Yakutat glacier. For many years, Yakutat’s two main tributaries merged and formed a 5-kilometer (3-mile) calving face that extended far into Harlequin Lake. In the past decade, satellites observed a rapid terminus retreat and the breakup of the ice tongue in 2010. As a result, the calving front divided into two sections, with one running east-west and another running north-south.  > More information and annotated images Image Credit: NASA Earth Observatory image by Robert Simmon, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey Caption: Adam Voiland

[ http://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNASA/bulletins/cafe4d?reqfrom=share ]

This e-mail update was generated automatically based on your subscriptions. Some updates may belong to more than one category, resulting in duplicate notices.

GHSP Journal, Volume 2, Issue 3 – 14 New Articles on Successes in Global Health Programs

USAID: From the American People [ http://www.usaid.gov/what-we-do/global-health ] *Join Global Health on GH on Facebook [ http://www.facebook.com/USAIDGH/ ]
Follow Global Health on GH on Twitter [ http://www.twitter.com/USAIDGH ]*

GLOBAL HEALTH: SCIENCE AND PRACTICE. Dedicated to what works in global health programs. A community health worker demonstrates kangaroo care so a grandmother can help warm her 2 week old granddaughter. Baby Sunita was one of the first babies resuscitated with a bag and mask at a community health post. Copyright Sanjana Shrestha/Save the Children. [ http://www.ghspjournal.org/content/current ]

"Global Health: Science and Practice" (GHSP), a no-fee, peer-reviewed, open-access journal, is targeted to global health professionals, particularly program implementers, to validate their experiences and program results by peer reviewers and to share them with the greater global health community.

August 2014 | Volume 2 | Issue 3

Here are highlights of the articles in the August 2014 issue:


* Can oxytocin survive the heat in home storage conditions? [ http://dx.doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-14-00102 ]
* Is there more compelling evidence for global health programs than from RCTs? [ http://dx.doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-14-00066 ]
* What does it take to make cookstoves work as an intervention? [ http://dx.doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-14-00060 ]
* What are the challenges to scaling up visual inspection-based cancer prevention programs in Guatemala? [ http://dx.doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-14-00073 ]
* Can traditional birth attendants be trained to refer at-risk newborns in a rural African setting? [ http://dx.doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-14-00045 ]
* Where were the health facilities in Haiti when the earthquake struck? [ http://dx.doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-14-00029 ]

View a list of all articles by article type below, or read the entire *current issue* [ http://www.ghspjournal.org/content/current ] online.

Visit the *GHSP website* [ http://www.ghspjournal.org/ ] to read and comment on the articles, and *subscribe to receive alerts* [ http://www.ghspjournal.org/cgi/alerts ] when new articles and issues are published.

EDITORIALS

Evidence-based public health: not only whether it works, but how it can be made to work practicably at scale [ http://dx.doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-14-00066 ]

Because public health must operate at scale in widely diverse, complex situations, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have limited utility for public health. Other methodologies are needed. A key conceptual backbone is a detailed ‘‘theory of change’’ to apply appropriate evidence for each operational component. Synthesizing patterns of findings across multiple methodologies provides key insights. Programs operating successfully across a variety of settings can provide some of the best evidence. Challenges include judging the quality of such evidence and assisting programs to apply it. WHO and others should shift emphasis from RCTs to more relevant evidence when assessing public health issues.

James D Shelton

Oxytocin: taking the heat [ http://dx.doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-14-00102 ]

Oxytocin-in-Uniject satisfied the standards of its temperature-time indicator (TTI) in severe home storage conditions, although that required resupply every 30 days—a logistically onerous programmatic standard. Possible advances include: (1) incorporating TTIs with packaged batches of less expensive and more widely used conventional vials of oxytocin; (2) using TTIs calibrated more closely to the actual temperature sensitivity of oxytocin; and (3) researching whether a lower dose of oxytocin would be equally efficacious in preventing postpartum hemorrhage.

Stephen Hodgins

COMMENTARIES

Combating trafficking in persons: a call to action for global health professionals [ http://dx.doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-13-00142 ]

Health care professionals can help identify victims of human trafficking, who commonly come into contact with providers during captivity. Providers can also help restore the physical and mental health of trafficking survivors. Training should focus on recognizing trafficking signs, interviewing techniques, and recommended responses when a victim is identified.

Luis CdeBaca, Jane Nady Sigmon

Maximizing the benefits of improved cookstoves: moving from acquisition to correct and consistent use [ http://dx.doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-14-00060 ]

The adoption of clean cooking technologies goes beyond mere product acquisition and requires attention to issues of cooking traditions, user engagement, gender dynamics, culture, and religion to effect correct and consistent use.

Anita Shankar, Michael Johnson, Ethan Kay, Raj Pannu, Theresa Beltramo, Elisa Derby, Stephen Harrell, Curt Davis, Helen Petach

ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Are national policies and programs for prevention and management of postpartum hemorrhage and preeclampsia adequate? A key informant survey in 37 countries [ http://dx.doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-14-00034 ]

Most surveyed countries have many supportive policies and program elements, but issues remain that impede maternal health efforts, including: inconsistent availability of essential commodities, particularly misoprostol; limitations on midwives’ scope of practice; incomplete or out-of-date service delivery guidelines; and weak reporting systems.

Jeffrey Michael Smith, Sheena Currie, Tirza Cannon, Deborah Armbruster, Julia Perri

Cumulative effects of heat exposure and storage conditions of Oxytocin-in-Uniject in rural Ghana: implications for scale up [ http://dx.doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-14-00043 ]

Oxytocin-in-Uniject devices could be stored 30 to 40 days without refrigeration under typical field conditions, with wastage levels below 10%, based on simulation studies.

Luke C Mullany, Sam Newton, Samuel Afari-Asiedu, Edward Adiibokah, Charlotte T Agyemang, Patience Cofie, Steve Brooke, Seth Owusu-Agyei, Cynthia K Stanton

Strategic contracting practices to improve procurement of health commodities [ http://dx.doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-14-00068 ]

Practices such as flexible, pre-established framework agreements can improve timeliness and cost of procurement and help improve commodity security. Addressing legislative barriers and building technical capacity in contract management may facilitate the use of such practices.

Leslie Arney, Prashant Yadav, Roger Miller, Taylor Wilkerson

Major challenges to scale up of visual inspection-based cervical cancer prevention programs: the experience of Guatemalan NGOs [ http://dx.doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-14-00073 ]

Scale up of visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) in Guatemala encountered major challenges, including high attrition of people trained, didactic training without hands-on skills building, lack of continued supervision, and provision of VIA alone without immediate on-site provision of cryotherapy.

Anita Nandkumar Chary, Peter J Rohloff

Can traditional birth attendants be trained to accurately identify septic infants, initiate antibiotics, and refer in a rural African setting? [ http://dx.doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-14-00045 ]

Despite having limited training, these TBAs were able to accurately identify critically ill neonates, initiate treatment in the field, and refer for further care. Given their proximity to the mother/infant pair, and their role in rural communities, training and equipping TBAs in this role could be effective in reducing neonatal mortality.

Christopher John Gill, William B MacLeod, Grace Phiri-Mazala, Nicholas G Guerina, Mark Mirochnick, Anna B Knapp, Davidson H Hamer

Nationwide implementation of integrated community case management of childhood illness in Rwanda [ http://dx.doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-14-00080 ]

Between 2008 and 2011, Rwanda introduced iCCM of childhood illness nationwide. One year after iCCM rollout, community-based treatment for diarrhea and pneumonia had increased significantly, and under-5 mortality and overall health facility use had declined significantly.

Catherine Mugeni,* Adam C Levine,* Richard M Munyaneza, Epiphanie Mulindahabi, Hannah C Cockrell, Justin Glavis-Bloom, Cameron T Nutt, Claire M Wagner, Erick Gaju, Alphonse Rukundo, Jean Pierre Habimana, Corine Karema, Fidele Ngabo, Agnes Binagwaho

Plausible role for CHW peer support groups in increasing care-seeking in an integrated community case management project in Rwanda: a mixed methods evaluation [ http://dx.doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-14-00067 ]

During national scale up of iCCM in Rwanda, greater improvements in care-seeking were found in the districts where Kabeho Mwana implemented its model than in the rest of the country. Success was attributed to an emphasis on routine data, intensive monitoring, collaborative supervision, community mobilization and, in particular, CHW peer support groups.

Anne Langston, Jennifer Weiss, Justine Landegger, Thomas Pullum, Melanie Morrow, Melene Kabadege, Catherine Mugeni, Eric Sarriot

TECHNICAL NOTES

Exclusive breastfeeding: aligning the indicator with the goal [ http://dx.doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-14-00061 ]

While the global objective is exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) for a full 6 months duration, the standard indicator is a ‘‘prevalence’’ indicator, that is, the percentage of all children under age 6 months who are exclusively breastfed at a point in time. That yields a higher percentage than a more direct indicator of duration and can be easily misunderstood, exaggerating the amount of EBF. A measurement of actual percentage of children exclusively breastfeeding for a full 6 months can be easily calculated from standard DHS and MICS data.

Thomas W Pullum

FIELD ACTION REPORTS

Development and use of a master health facility list: Haiti’s experience during the 2010 earthquake response [ http://dx.doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-14-00029 ]

Collaboration between the Haitian government and NGOs after the 2010 earthquake contributed to a more accurate and complete master health facility list, which helped coordinate emergency response operations as well as strengthen the routine health information system. Open data and social networks facilitated the collection and sharing of health facility information and in maintenance of the list over time.

Alyson Rose-Wood, Nathan Heard, Roody Thermidor, Jessica Chan, Fanor Joseph, Gerald Lerebours, Antonio Zugaldia, Kimberly Konkel, Michael Edwards, Bill Lang, Carmen-Rosa Torres

STORIES FROM THE FIELD

Reaching out to a community to improve maternal health in Ghana: the story of one midwife [ http://dx.doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-14-00110 ]

John Kuumuori Ganle

GHSP is supported by the U.S. Agency for International Development and published by the Knowledge for Health project at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Center for Communication Programs in collaboration with the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services.

Learn more about GHSP on its website: www.ghspjournal.org [ http://www.ghspjournal.org/www.ghspjournal.org [ http://www.ghspjournal.org/ ].

USAID [ http://www.usaid.gov ] George Washington University, Department of Global Health [ http://sphhs.gwu.edu/departments/globalhealth/index.html ] Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health | Center for Communication Programs [ http://www.jhuccp.org ] Knowledge for Health [ http://www.k4health.org ]


" Photo source: Sanjana Shrestha/Save the Children."

[ http://www.twitter.com/USAIDGH ]

Media Day at Wallops for NASA Hurricane Airborne Mission

You are subscribed to Breaking News for NASA. This information has recently been updated, and is now available.

Media Day at Wallops for NASA Hurricane Airborne Mission [ http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/august/media-day-at-wallops-for-nasa-hurricane-airborne-mission ] 08/20/2014 12:00 PM EDT
As the Atlantic Ocean’s hurricane season hits its peak, media are invited to visit NASA’s latest airborne hurricane research mission using remotely piloted aircraft on Thursday, Sept. 11 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. EDT, at the agency’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

[ http://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNASA/bulletins/caf987?reqfrom=share ]

This e-mail update was generated automatically based on your subscriptions. Some updates may belong to more than one category, resulting in duplicate notices.

FEMA Major Disaster Declarations Update

Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page [ http://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USDHSFEMA/bulletins/cae8fe ].

You are subscribed to Major Disaster Declarations for FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency). This information has recently been updated, and is now available. North Dakota Severe Storms and Flooding [ http://www.fema.gov/disaster/4190 ] 08/19/2014 01:08 AM EDT
Major Disaster Declaration number 4190 issued Tue, 08/19/2014 - 00:00 

[ http://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USDHSFEMA/bulletins/cae8fe?reqfrom=share ]

NASA to Air Panel Discussion about Ancient Earth and Habitable Planets

You are subscribed to Breaking News for NASA. This information has recently been updated, and is now available.

NASA to Air Panel Discussion about Ancient Earth and Habitable Planets [ http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/august/nasa-to-air-panel-discussion-about-ancient-earth-and-habitable-planets ] 08/19/2014 12:00 PM EDT
NASA Television will live broadcast a discussion Wednesday, Aug. 20, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. EDT, with leading science experts describing what is known about our ancient Earth and how that information can guide the search for habitable planets orbiting other stars.

[ http://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNASA/bulletins/cad689?reqfrom=share ]

This e-mail update was generated automatically based on your subscriptions. Some updates may belong to more than one category, resulting in duplicate notices.

Testing Electric Propulsion

You are subscribed to Image of the Day for NASA. This information has recently been updated, and is now available.

Testing Electric Propulsion [ http://www.nasa.gov/aero/testing-electric-propulsion.html ] 08/19/2014 12:00 PM EDT On Aug. 19, National Aviation Day, a lot of people are reflecting on how far aviation has come in the last century. Could this be the future – a plane with many electric motors that can hover like a helicopter and fly like a plane, and that could revolutionize air travel? Engineers at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va., are studying the concept with models such as the unmanned aerial system GL-10 Greased Lightning. The GL-10, which has a 10-foot wingspan, recently flew successfully while tethered. Free-flight tests are planned in the fall of 2014. This research has helped lead to NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate efforts to better understand the potential of electric propulsion across all types, sizes and missions for aviation. Image Credit: NASA Langley/David C. Bowman

[ http://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNASA/bulletins/cad081?reqfrom=share ]

This e-mail update was generated automatically based on your subscriptions. Some updates may belong to more than one category, resulting in duplicate notices.